Open Source Software

Open Source Software
Examples
The Difference Between Open
Source Software and Other
Types of Software
Source Code
Not Open Source
Only the original authors of proprietary software can legally copy, inspect, and
alter that software. And in order to use proprietary software, computer users must
agree (usually by signing a license displayed the first time they run this software)
that they will not do anything with the software that the software's authors have
not expressly permitted. Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop are examples of
proprietary software.
Some software has source code that only the person, team, or organization who
created it—and maintains exclusive control over it—can modify. People call this
kind of software"proprietary" or "closed source" software.
Open Source
Open source software is different. Its authors make its source code
available to others who would like to view that code, copy it, learn
from it, alter it, or share it. LibreOffice and the GNU Image
Manipulation Program are examples of open source software.
Licenses
Not Open Source
Open source software is different. Its authors make its source code
available to others who would like to view that code, copy it, learn
from it, alter it, or share it. LibreOffice and the GNU Image
Manipulation Program are examples of open source software.
Open Source
Open source licenses affect the way people can use, study, modify, and distribute software. In general, open
source licenses grant computer users permission to use open source software for any purpose they wish.
Some open source licenses—what some people call "copyleft" licenses—stipulate that anyone who releases
a modified open source program must also release the source code for that program alongside it. Moreover,
some open source licenses stipulate that anyone who alters and shares a program with others must also
share that program's source code without charging a licensing fee for it.
By design, open source software licenses promote collaboration and sharing because they permit other
people to make modifications to source code and incorporate those changes into their own projects. They
encourage computer programmers to access, view, and modify open source software whenever they like,
as long as they let others do the same when they share their work.
Types
Advantages
Opensource software is free to use, distribute, and modify. It has lower costs,
and in most cases this is only a fraction of the cost of their proprietary
counterparts.
Opensource software is more secured as the code is accessible to everyone.
Anyone can fix bugs as they are found, and users do not have to wait for the
next release. The fact that is continuously analyzed by a large community
produces secure and stable code.
Open source is not dependent on the company or author that originally created it.
Even if the company fails, the code continues to exist and be developed by its
users. Also, it uses open standards accessible to everyone; thus, it does not have
the problem of incompatible formats that exist in proprietary software.
the companies using opensource software do not have to think about
complex licensing models and do not need antipiracy measures like product
activation or serial number.
Disadvantages
The main disadvantage of opensource software is not being straightforward to use.
Opensource operating systems like Linux cannot be learned in a day. They require effort
and possibly training from your side before you are able to master them. You may need
to hire a trained person to make things easier, but this will incur additional costs.
There is a shortage of applications that run both on open source and proprietary
software; therefore, switching to an opensource platform involves a compatibility
analysis of all the other software used that run on proprietary platforms
In addition, there are many ongoing parallel developments on open source
software. This creates confusion on what functionalities are present in
which versions.
many of the latest hardware are incompatible to the opensource
platform; so you have to rely on thirdparty drivers.
Definition
The term "open source" refers to something people can modify and share because its design is publicly accessible.
The term originated in the context of software development to designate a specific approach to creating computer programs. Today, however, "open source" designates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.
Open source software is software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance.
"Source code" is the part of software that most computer users don't ever see; it's the code computer programmers can manipulate to change how a piece of software—a "program" or "application"—works. Programmers who have access to a computer program's source code can improve that program by adding features to it or fixing parts that don't always work correctly.
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