Philosophy of Higher Education

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Philosophy of
Higher Education
History of ideas
some people
Socrates
Plato
Aristotle
Roger Bacon
Gallileo
Newton
Ida Lovelace
Marie Curie
Newman
Dewey
Freire
Foucault
Popper
Schön
Barnett
Brookfield
Maskell & Robinson
Gailson
Dror
Beetham
Žižek
institutions of society
Production
Primary
Agriculture
Extractive industry
Secondary
Manufacturing
Reproduction
Religion
Family
Class
Education
Institutions of culture
Art
Music
Defence?
The commons?
Concrete instances
purpose of higher educattion
filtration
for employment
for social status
to exercise power
training
education
The University
spatial metaphors
Higher
Deeper
Wider
Further
was there ever a "golden age"?
academic identity
Identity
Community
Cloister
Corporation
Third space
Learning theory
biological bases of cognition
-isms and -ologies
realism
idealism
positivism
critical realism
social constructivism
epistemologies
ontology: identity and unity
autonomy & discipline
Personal (ego) identity:
idiosyncratic & person-specific
attributes; "who am I?"
embodiment
Bayne
Self-conscious, experiential continuity
Developmental
Social identity:
social-order attributes
perceived by others
Role
Category
Biography
Identity projects
Transpersonal psychology
and distributed cognition
taxonomies of disciplines
Liberal arts
HEFCE/HESA
difference
Inductive
deductive
learning cycle
team roles
learning styles
identity politics
accessibility
criticality
Barnett: exposing assumptions
Brookfield, Fairclough, Bhabha: exposing power
Scollon, Barthes, Bourdiu, Latour: exposing culture
competence
Knowledge
skill
awareness
risk
projects
Policy
Levels of analysis
Global
National
Regional
Local
Institutional
Departmrntal
Personal
Drivers
The Economy
Quality & governance
Global responsiveness
Openness
Funding
Outcomes
Efficiency
Sustainable solutions
Enhanced networks
Participation
Leadership
Development
Pragmatics
Learning, teaching & assessment
Research
Business & Community Engagement
Learning Resources
Administration
ICT Services
Estates, environment & energy
Mobile, location-aware, ambient,
pervasive communication/connectivity/cloud/
computing (MLAPC)
Activities
What does it mean to you?
Your academic identity
Methods
Socratic
Scholastic
Scientific
Reflective
Goal directed
Your personal timeline
Your golden age
Limits of responsibility
Aims and objectives:
going wide
big picture
Contribute to the development
of a scholarly & critical
understanding of Higher
Education in society
criticality
Explain and apply the concept of a
covert curriculum to objective-led
learning, teaching and assessment
(and management)
access & participation
Apply your analysis of discourses
of education and power to the
sustainability of social order attributes
and the institutions of society
globalisation &
internationalism
Explore the contingencies of truth
as it underlies disciplinary
(experimental) methods
responsibility & ethics
Apply a richer understanding
of your role in higher education
to the improvement of learning for
your students, yourself, your discipline
and institution(s)
curricular engagement
Interpret and actualise
HEA values in your practice
academic community
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