Analysis of the Chapters of the 2030 EU Biodiversity Strategy

Analysis of the Chapters of the 2030 EU Biodiversity Strategy
1. Biodiversity - the need for urgent action
The clear message that protecting and restoring biodiversity and well-functioning ecosystems
is fundamental to boosting our resilience and preventing the emergence and spread of future
diseases and that we need to give nature the space it needs to also create healthy and
resilient societies.
The clear message that investing in nature protection and restoration will also be critical for
Europe’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis and that when restarting the economy,
it is crucial to avoid falling back and locking ourselves into damaging old habits.
The clear message that investing in nature protection and restoration will also be critical for
Europe’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis and that when restarting the economy,
it is crucial to avoid falling back and locking ourselves into damaging old habits.
The aim of the strategy to serve as a compass and a frame for the EU’s green economic
transition, including the industrial, energy, circular economy and sustainable food transitions.
The whole society approach, reflecting that action by citizens, businesses, social partners,
research organisations and strong partnerships between different levels of government will be
needed to protect and restore nature.
The acknowledgement of the need for urgent, transformative and ambitious action to reverse
biodiversity loss.
The reference to the role of the EU at the global level to act by example and take the lead at the
UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) COP 15 summit, expected in the negotiations for
a transformative and ambitious post-2020 global biodiversity framework.
While the five main direct drivers of biodiversity loss (land and sea use changes,
overexploitation of resources and organisms, climate change, pollution and Invasive Alien
Species (IAS)) are clearly highlighted, the important reference that those are underpinned by
unsustainable production and consumption patterns and commitments to reduce the
EU’s ecological footprint, is missing.
Furthermore the Biodiversity Strategy does not refer to what drives unsustainable production
and consumption and what reducing our ecological footprint actually implies.
Further improvements needed
WWF welcomes
2. Protecting and restoring nature in the EuroPean Union
2.1. A coherent network of protected areas
 The commitment to legally protect a minimum of 30% of the EU land area and 30% of the EU sea area and integrate ecological corridors.
 The commitment to strictly protect at least ⅓ of the EU protected areas (10% on land and 10% at sea), including all remaining EU primary and old-growth forests.
 The commitment to effectively manage all protected areas, focus on areas of very high biodiversity value, defining clear conservation objectives and measures, and monitoring them appropriately
The acknowledgement that investments in green and blue infrastructure and cooperation across
borders among Member States should be promoted and supported, including through the
European Territorial Cooperation.
The assessment by the Commission by 2024 on whether an EU legislative proposal is needed
to reach the protected area targets. This is a step in the right direction to make the target
enforceable.
WWF welcomes
2.2. An EU Nature Restoration Plan: restoring ecosystems across land and sea
2.2.1. Strengthening the EU legal framework for nature restoration.
The commitment to present binding EU nature restoration targets in 2021 to restore degraded
ecosystems, in particular those with the most potential to capture and store carbon and to
prevent and reduce the impact of natural disasters.
The commitment that no species and habitats protected under the Birds and Habitats
Directives should show a deterioration in trends and status.
WWF welcomes
2.2.2. Bringing nature back to agricultural land
The commitment to have at least 25% of agricultural land under organic farming.
he commitment to have 10% of agricultural area under high-diversity landscape features such as buffer strips, fallow land, hedges or ponds.
The commitment to reduce the risk and use of chemical pesticides by 50% in the EU by 2030.
The commitment to reverse the decline in pollinators and the full implementation and review of the EU pollinators’ initiative, to evaluate if additional measures are necessary.
WWF welcomes
2.2.3. Addressing land take and restoring soil ecosystems
2.2.4. Increasing the quantity of forests and improving their health and resilience
The commitment to define, map, monitor and strictly protect all remaining EU primary and old growth forests and to advocate for the same globally (section 2.1).
A clear statement that all forests need to be preserved in good health to retain their functions for biodiversity and climate change.
The commitment to plant at least 3 billion additional trees in Europe in full respect with ecological principles. Strong safeguards as for where and how (fully respecting ecological principles like the use of autochthonous species etc.) are however needed to make sure this will not be detrimental to biodiversity.
WWF welcomes
2.2.5. Win-win solutions for energy generation
2.2.6. Restoring the good environmental status of marine ecosystems
2.2.7. Restoring freshwater ecosystems
2.2.8. Greening urban and peri-urban areas
2.2.9. Reducing pollution
2.2.10. Addressing invasive alien species
3. Enabling transformative change
3.1. A new governance framework
3.2. Stepping up implementation and enforcement of EU environmental legislation
3.3. Building on an integrated and whole of society approach
3.3.1. Business for biodiversity
3.3.2. Investments, pricing and taxation
3.3.3. Measuring and integrating the value of nature
3.3.4. Improving knowledge, education and skills
4. The European Union for an ambitious global biodiversity agenda
4.1 Raising the level of ambition and commitment worldwide
4.2. Using external action to promote the EU’s ambition
4.2.1. International Ocean Governance
4.2.2. Trade policy
4.2.3. International cooperation, neighbourhood policy and resource mobilisation
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